Krysten's Collards & Brussels Sprout Salad

Posted by Callies Biscuits on

My childhood friend Krysten lived in California for fifteen years. That distance did not caused our friendship to fade one bit. Talking on the phone about cooking is how we stay connected. Cooking is also how we connect in person. When we get together, food and drinks are always part of our agenda!

As a Southern transplant in California, Krysten is always introducing her West Coast friends to Southern cooking. In this recipe, she takes collards, a Southern staple, and prepares it in a fresh California salad rather than cooking it slowly as we would in the South. Krysten is a super-talented cook, and I love the way this recipe represents her bicoastal sensibility and our friendship that’s been able to thrive cross country, as well.

Ingredients

    - 1 cup pecan pieces - 6 to 8 slices thick cut bacon, diced (about 1 cup) - 1 1/2 pounds collard greens, stems removed - 12 ounces Brussels sprouts, shaved or sliced paper thin - 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese - Mustard Vinaigrette Dressing - Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions

    1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Spread the pecans on a baking sheet and toast for 6 to 8 minutes. Let cool. 1. Cook the bacon in a skillet until browned and crispy. Remove to a paper bag to drain and cool. (Save the drippings for another use.) 1. Cut the collards into very thin strips with a very sharp knife or pulse in a food processor until finely chopped. Remove to a large bowl. Add the Brussels sprouts, pecans, bacon, and Parmesan. Toss with the dressing. 1. Let the salad rest in the fridge for about 3 minutes taste and season with salt and pepper before serving.

Mustard Vinaigrette Dressing

    - 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard - 3/4 teaspoon honey - 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice - 1/4 cup sherry vinegar - 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil - 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt - Freshly ground black pepper

    "In this recipe, she takes collards, a Southern staple, and prepares it in a fresh California salad rather than cooking it slowly as we would in the South."